Education & Audience Enrichment

Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world.
– GBS

Gingold Theatrical Group’s work to promote theatre that supports human rights and the freedom of speech extends beyond our stages into classrooms and studios throughout New York City.

Through the following education and audience enrichment programs, we allow students young and old to learn more about Shaw, his work, and the causes he valued. GTG encourages people of all ages to bring Shaw’s values of individual liberty and independent thought into their daily lives.

GTG is always eager to build new educational partnerships. If you are affiliated with an organization that you believe would benefit from a GTG educational partnership, please contact us at info@gingoldgroup.org.

Acting Classes

As New York’s Shaw connection, GTG regularly offers classes for actors at all stages of experience.

Our fall, 2017 class, From Shakespeare to Shaw will be co-taught by GTG Founding Artistic Director David Staller and Associate Director Stephen Brown-Fried and will focus on the similarities and differences between Shakespeare and Shaw’s writing, and how actors can best bridge the gap between their two styles.

From Shakespeare to Shaw will meet from 6:30 to 9:30 pm on November 14, 21, 28 and December 5 and will be limited to twelve participants.
Tuition is $300.
For more information, please call 212.355.7823 or email us at info@gingoldgroup.org.

Audience Enrichment

GTG offers the following programs to add to our audience’s experience of our work. Click on either of the links below for more information on these programs:

Shaw Club

Our free monthly discussion group the precedes each Project Shaw reading.

Learn More

Shaw New York

Our annual festival of seminars, lectures, and other programs to complement our mainstage production

Learn More

In addition to these programs, every one of our Project Shaw readings is followed by a lively discussion with the director, actors, and special guests on the themes of that play.

Partnerships with High Schools and Universities

GTG partners with faculty at a variety of educational institutions to develop curriculum around Shaw’s plays and ideals. Each GTG partnership is unique, and specifically designed to best serve the particular students in question. Below are examples of a few of our partnerships:

Broome Street Academy

GTG is currently partnering with Broome Street Academy, a tuition-free public charter high school whose admission policy gives preference to students who are homeless, in foster care, or from low performing schools, to teach a six-week curriculum around Shaw’s Pygmalion. After reading and discussing selections from the play, students will create their own plays in response to Shaw’s ideas. These plays will then be developed and performed by professional actors.

SUNY Stony Brook

GTG Founding Artistic Director, David Staller, partnered with Professor Andrew Flescher to create a course offered through SUNY Stony Brook’s English Department on Ethics and Humanities as seen through Shaw’s plays.

The Regis School

GTG regularly takes part in an ongoing program at Manhattan’s Regis School on Shaw studies.

Lighthouse International

GTG partnered for three years with Lighthouse International’s Saturday morning program for inner-city teens. This program is specifically designed for blind and visually impaired young adults to help prepare them for independent lives after their high-school years. Employing scenes or quotes from Shaw, the students took part in lively debates about meanings and creative interpretations, relating the Shavian precepts to their own lives and ambitions for the future.

Baruch College

From 2006 until 2009, GTG partnered with faculty at Baruch College in a course on English Literature for Business majors. A Shaw play was chosen for in-depth study each semester. Mr. Staller and volunteer actors would attend these classes to read and discuss the plays. Discussions focused on the parallels between the daily socio-economic and political lives of the students and the issues dealt with in Shaw’s plays. At the end of each term, the students were invited to The Players to read scenes from these plays on stage.